Tribute to Friedrich Streich, creator of the Orange Mouse

Statue of the Maus (right) and the Elephant at Anger, Erfurt’s city center. Photo taken in 2011

 

In the US we had our forefathers who created Bugs Bunny and all of his friends as part of the Looney Tunes gang- namely Tex Avery, Fritz Freling and Chuck Jones, with Mel Blanc doing the voice of all the characters. We had Charles M. Schulz who penned Charlie Brown and Snoopy with various kids taking turns doing voices of the characters. And we had a husband-wife team that created, animated and voiced Woody Woodpecker (Walter and Gracie Lantz (née Stafford)).

In Germany, every Sunday morning on TV, we would be greeted by the Mouse and the Elephant with a series of short clips to go along with stories to laugh and learn- the German title is “Lach- & Sachgeschichte.” While there were no one doing voices of the Mouse, Elephant, Yellow Duck and the Pink Bunny, the animations resembled the modern version of silent films with background piano music and some sound effects. These were the works of Friedirch Streich, who for over 40 years, penned more then 330 short animations for the audience to enjoy, both kids as well as adults. Born in Zurich, Switzerland in 1934, Streich had already garnered fame as a cartoonist for the Zurcher Zeitung (Zurich) and the Süddeutsche and Abendzeitungen newspapers (in Munich), an actor and even a director before starting the cartoon series with the Mouse and Elephant in March, 1971. At the time of its debut, the orange mouse was the main attraction. Streich added his sidekick, the Blue Elephant, four years later, whom he touted as “the smallest elephant in the world,” according to German public channel, WDR. They became the dynamic duo and have been making people laugh ever since. The Yellow Duck was added in 1987 and appeared in one of the three 30-second cartoon strips per episode of “Lach- & Sachgeschichte.” The blue elephant would later have his daily kids show in the morning with the pink bunny entitled “Elephantastisch.”  Streich’s signature for every animation with the Mouse and the Elephant was finding a solution for every problem the Mouse and/or the Elephant would face, no matter how out of the ordinary it may be. There are too numerous examples worth mentioning, but this link features the top 17 clips of the tandem. Funny and silly as the scenes were, the main slogan was “When there is a will, there is a way.” Streich did it his way, which is why his legacy will be remembered.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-BGepjoNJE

On 3 October of this year, Friedrich Streich passed away peacefully at his home in Munich. He was 80 years old. His death coincided with the 24th anniversary of the German Reunification, and while it may have overshadowed some of the events that took place across the country, Streich belongs to the list of people that made the new Germany, showing visitors (including those with children) that the Mouse, the Elephant and their friends are typical of German culture. Because they are still one of the key anchors in German television, the show must go on. In the hearts of Germans and those who know and like them, there will always be the Mouse, the Elephant and their friends. Forever and all time to come. Streich will forever keep us laughing no matter where he is at.

To honor Friedrich Streich, WDR has a tribute that was produced on 12 October, featuring the making of the Mouse and the best hits. Although in German, you will have a chance to learn how the characters came to life, apart from learning the language. The link:

http://www.wdrmaus.de/maus_wall/friedrich_streich.php5

And from the Flensburg Files, we just like to say thanks for all the memories and making us laugh. Your legacy with the Mouse and Elephant will go on in the hearts of kids and adults alike.